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Hardy, Self Fertile Fig Collection


  • We have carefully curated a collection of figs that will instantly add a touch of the Mediterranean to your garden during the months of summer. 

  • The Hardy, Self Fertile Fig Collection contains one of each plant in either an 8cm or 9cm pot.

  • Ficus carica 'Brunswick' - Brunswick Fig: Ficus carica 'Brunswick' is an attractive, heavy cropping fig tree. The large pear-shaped fruits have a yellow-red flesh which is sweet tasting. The Brunswick Fig has deeply lobed, bold leaves. Self-fertile and particularly hardy. It is quite vigorous in growth. The fig is a well-known fruit, cultivated since ancient times and grows wild in dry and sunny areas. It is mostly cultivated around the world for its fruits, but it is also a great architectural plant with very ornamental leaves, plus the foliage turns yellowish in the Autumn. After their fall, the fruits often remain on the bare branches. We have different leaf forms, deeply lobed to slightly lobed.

  • Ficus carica Dottato - Common Fig Dottato: Ficus carica Dottato also known as the Common Fig Dottato is a yellowy green fig tree that is cold tolerant and self-fertile.

    Ficus carica 'Turkey'- Brown Turkey Fig: Ficus carica 'Turkey' is the most common fig variety, planted on the British Isles, renowned for its hardiness, cold tolerance and regular fruiting, a self-pollinating cultivar with droplet shaped, light brown (with darker stripes) fruits which are on the larger side. Very hardy and self-fertile, ideal for UK conditions. Fruit size can reach 80-100g with dark red flesh. No need of fig wasp for pollination. Suitable for pot growing. The Brown Turkey Fig is a well known fruit, cultivated since ancient times and grows wild in dry and sunny areas. It is mostly cultivated around the world for its fruits but it is also a great architectural plant with very ornamental leaves, plus the foliage turns yellowish in the Autumn. After their fall, the fruits often remain on the bare branches.

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